A politically incorrect blog by Joey Ayoub (Under Renovation)

Short comment on today’s school massacre

No one can ever justify what happened in the US today. I weep for the victims and offer my condolences to all the parents and families of the little ones. That this happened to children makes it an evil that cannot be equaled and I can barely express my anger as I write this down.

I just wanted to convey, if I may, a message that I do not want to convey but feel that I must. For those who still do not realize it, I ask for your understanding that these tragedies occur in my region on a near-daily basis and that the anger you feel today is even greater here. To realize why I say such a thing,  I would ask those living in the West to pay attention to the difference in media coverage between a tragedy involving Americans and one involving Iraqis, or Afghans, or Pakistanis, or Palestinians.

Many families were destroyed today. Quoting Obama’s recent speech, “they had their entire lives ahead of them. Birthdays, graduations, weddings, kids of their own” and that’s a fact. One can only feel sadness and compassion towards the family and an uncontrolled hatred towards whatever created someone to do something like that – you can go into sociology and psychology and ask yourself why is the US so prone to school shootings, but I do not want to do that now.

I do not want you to feel what the suffering Arab children and mothers and fathers feel. It is not an emotion I would desire for anyone. But as someone who has spoken to these men and women, who have suffered tragedies beyond description due to US action, I would only urge Americans to accord us a few moments in their pain and suffering and remember that their government’s current policy is responsible for what happened today multiplied a thousandfold.

Whether we’re talking about Obama’s barbaric drones in Pakistan or Israel’s free murder of Palestinians on a near-daily basis with complete US support or the recent and current wars that have destroyed so many people’s lives and livelihoods, it all comes down to the fact that what you feel right now is felt every day around here. The 30 innocent human beings in the US turn into hundreds, thousands, and hundred of thousands of human beings in the Middle East. And I speak not of those resulting from internal conflict but merely of those caused by the US government.

And so on this day of international grief, let us transcend the petty boundaries between us that have no raison d’etre and feel sadness when sad things happen, regardless to whom. Children are children whether they are in Connecticut or Gaza or Baghdad or Kabul. Help us prevent further sufferings such as this one. I wish a full recovery to all those wounded today. Peace.

3 Responses to “Short comment on today’s school massacre”

  1. leelouz

    i agree… children are children, no matter what colour, religion or nationality. which means that the grief felt today should be remembered for all the innocent souls dying everyday in the middle east… My condolences to all parents who have lost a child…here and there…

    Reply
  2. This is Bigger than Connecticut | Grace, Tissue-thin

    [...] Further, children in many countries live in constant fear of attack. What child deserves that? We are in shock and in mourning because this was unexpected, but the unexpectedness also casts light on the luxury we have of being in shock and in mourning as a national community. Not one child should be afraid that their life will end. Not one. It is horrific that this happened, but what about the children and adults, the educators and the parents, who have to fear for their lives every day? What about the parents of Mohamed Salayma, or those of the other (approx) 1500 children in Palestine that have been killed in the past 12 years as a result of the constant and excessive violence in which children must grow up. I have a friend who speaks of waking up in the middle of the night, throwing up out of fear and nerves, when bombs would fall within earshot of his home in Israel. He grew up like that. How is that fair? [...]

    Reply

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