Politics & Society

HFT Newsletter #7

Book of the Month

Drowned Worlds was put together by Jonathan Strahan and features short fiction by Paul McAuley, Ken Liu, Kim Stanley Robinson (featured), Nina Allan, Kathleen Ann Goonan, Christopher Rowe, Nalo Hopkinson, Sean Williams, Jeffrey Ford, Lavie Tidhar, Rachel Swirsky, James Morrow, Charlies Jane Anders, Sam J. Miller and Cahterynne M. Valente. Named after the Ballard story ‘The Drown World’, Drowned Worlds explores scenarios of ecological collapse with a focus on seas rising. Some stories resonated with me, others not really, but the entire thing is well worth the effort if you’re – like me – constantly anxious about global warming. It doesn’t offer ‘solutions’, to be clear. It’s just a contribution to a collective imaginary about climate change that I think we all need to be urgently cultivating.

Next Page: Recent The Fire These Times episodes + upcoming ones

4 thoughts on “HFT Newsletter #7

  1. I shared a panel with an academic once and she went on a self-help style monologue about courage and creativity in academic research. I did my best to explain that a student’s anticipation of how she evaluates their academic work is an entirely different experience when the outcome will define their immigration status, and possibly that of their direct families.
    It’s hard to “add to the body of literature” freely and creatively when the off chance of not doing it to your supervisor’s liking could mean denial of access to the only safe land you can be in (since failing to “win” the right to remain in the U.K. for someone who comes from a conflict country could automatically deny them access to all of Europe, thanks to Dublin Regulation… so they could be stuck in an immigration limbo for decades) she entertained the idea for a minute but rapidly went back to telling me about the need to think out of the box and be courageous. These are the brains that are enriching the body of literature, whatever the hell that means!

    1. This is why I’ve stopped bothering to go on these self-help-oriented panels that my university keeps on inviting me to. I’ve been to half a dozen of them over the years and it’s always the same thing. I’ve even tried to send emails whenever they’d add stuff ‘if you still need help please send us an email’ but these would never actually end up anywhere.

      It was really baffling to learn from my first or second meeting with my supervisor at the University of Edinburgh that not attending meetings could lead to them reporting me to the home office. It was one hell of a welcome week.

      And I’m honestly among the luckier ones, despite everything. I have an Argentinian passport which I used as my backup, not that it gave me any right to actually sustain myself in the UK in any sustainable way.

      UK higher ed especially is a scam. There’s no other way of describing it. You have to pay to work for them and then have to do extra work to pay for the costs of working for them. If there was some justice the UK government would be owing students millions of pounds.

  2. the links at the bottom describing the next page aren’t clickable for me and the numbers don’t highlight after they’ve been clicked so i found navigating the multi-page format hard on a phone, just fyi!

    1. Hey! Thanks for letting me know. I’ve made the ‘next page’ at the bottom clickable now so hopefully this should be better.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.