A politically incorrect blog by Joey Ayoub

Tribute to Beirut Jam Sessions

Of all the interesting projects born out of Beirut’s recent burst of creativity, few come close to being as groovy as Beirut Jam Sessions.

Starting off as a mere get together of like-minded people, Beirut Jam Sessions, or BJS, came to life thanks to the efforts of three passionate music lovers – Anthony Semaan, Jessica Naime, and Talia Souki -  living between Paris and Beirut. Their goal? bringing local and international artists to you.

Although each of the three have their own story to tell, one can can say that Beirut Jam Sessions officially started with Emilie Gassin’s concert at DRM back in June the 6th, 2012 which was followed by Nadeah‘s a couple of months later. And now, everyone’s waiting for the Wanton Bishop’s concert at Solea V on the 23rd of this month.

More than the music itself, which is significant in its own right, my respect for Beirut Jam Sessions is mainly based on its successful incarnation of the Indie spirit that I love so much. The likes of Fleet Foxes, Bon Iver, Tallest Man on Earth, Mumford & Sons and King Charles take up such a big part of my musical interests that I find it quite hard to express my gratefulness for Beirut Jam Sessions and what it represents.

Lebanon is in need of a breath of fresh air, now more than ever.  And it is a sad fact that initiatives such as this one don’t get the attention of the majority of Lebanon’s internet population, yet. But no matter, its impact is growing with over 2,800 likes on Facebook and over 37,000 views on YouTube. Local talent such as The Wanton Bishops, Oak, Goldfish Parade, Karim Douaidy, Lazzy Lung, and the one and only Charlie Rayne as well as a few others are being given a platform to make a name for themselves among Lebanon’s growing Indie scene.

With all the generic crap passing for music these days, it’s always a joy to discover artists that do it for the love of music. And it’s an even greater one to discover fellow Lebanese enriching our culture in their diversity and musical boldness. The more Lebanon can give itself a break, the better off we’ll be.

It goes without saying that the more people check them out, the more popular they get, the wider their audience and the happier I get. So wanna make me happy? I’m sure you do. Watch them, like them, follow them by clicking on the following links:

YouTube account

Facebook Page

Twitter Account

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And finally, since Mr Charlie Rayne is my personal favorite, I’ll be biased:

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